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Friday, July 10, 2015

Queen Anne's Lace


Walking up the hill every morning allows me to view each season of wild growth.  Summer brings Queen Anne's Lace.  Oh how I love to see these lacy plants growing along the side of the road - or in the little cove that I pass each day.



As a child I remember reading a book about a girl (of course) who lived near a field of Queen Anne's Lace.  I didn't know what in the world it was -- but just the name alone and the description of the lacy flower made me want to have some.

Its taken me many years to get to that point but I'm oh so delighted to share my summer with this beautiful plant.



Oh, and here are a few 'facts' about Queen Anne's Lace that I've gathered.  Its called a 'Wild Carrot'.  It is biennial in that it lives for two years.  It will spend the first year growing bigger and then bloom in the second year. I suppose this means that I won't see these beauties next year, if this is their second year.  Caterpillars of the Eastern Swallow Butterfly eat the leaves.  Bees and other insects drink the nectar.


"There are always flowers for those who want to see them." - Henri Matisse  




8 comments:

  1. Oh Cool!! I had read other bloggers refer to Wild Carrot and never knew what it was. Of course you will enjoy this patch of Queen's Lace next year because don't you see all those first year plants mixed in with the second year plants? That's the way it works :).

    I am going out today to dig up some Thistle that I saw growing along the road. I absolutely LOVE Thistle. Terry says it's a weed but it is a flower to me!! It's all in the perception, don't you think?

    Have a great weekend.
    xx, Carol

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  2. Penny, look in the middle of a mature Queen Ann's Lace blossom for one tiny dark red flower among all the white ones. I'm sure there's a story attached to that, googling it will surely uncover it. We have them growing wild around the bay and at home, and I also love them.

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  3. Barbara, I checked out the 'red dot' online. I didn't see any in the flowers I walked past but will look again tomorrow morning. Apparently that red dot is the reason for the plant's name. According to the legend the plant was named for Queen Anne saying that the red dot was blood from her finger which occurred while she was sewing. Lovely story.

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  4. Barbara, I checked out the 'red dot' online. I didn't see any in the flowers I walked past but will look again tomorrow morning. Apparently that red dot is the reason for the plant's name. According to the legend the plant was named for Queen Anne saying that the red dot was blood from her finger which occurred while she was sewing. Lovely story.

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  5. Before we moved, Queen Anne's Lace was one of the highlights of my garden love. I don't have any now, and I miss it!

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  6. I love this plant in fact all umbillifers but they don't grow well in my garden despite growing all around in the hedgerows.

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  7. All that abundant growth is very cheering, isn't it!

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  8. I always think of it as a weed as the hedgerows are full of it! I need to look closer. ;o)

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